- Contemporary Visual Arts for Human Rights -

Chiara Bertin

Posted on March 09 2016

Chiara Bertin is an italian visual designer who lives between Italy and Malysia, busy in various spheres of visual culture through research-based graphic projects involving drawing media theory and prints.

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Chiara Bertin is an italian visual designer who lives between Italy and Malysia, busy in various spheres of visual culture through research-based graphic projects involving drawing media theory and prints. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Multimedia Communication, a Master’s Degree in Multimedia Design from the Academy of Fine Arts of Florence and studied Contemporary Art in Venice. In these last years Chiara Bertin's artworks have been exhibited in galleries and festivals throughout Europe, USA and South-America, and she has done several creative foreign projects through her partecipation in artistic program residencies.
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What is central in the work of this artist is the relationship she has with media, in particular the mass-media, defined using her own words “so powerful as a tool, and so dangerous as a weapon.
Linked to pop culture, through the use of several media as digital graphic, illustrations, video and photography, Chiara Bertin questions us on human condition and on our perception of “reality”, at the same time she raises social issues as the sexualization of the female image in the media, the media voyeurism or consumerism characterizing the contemporary society. 
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"Where have you been?"Buy it

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L.A.: Hello Chiara, to start who were the first artists that inspired you? Who inspires you today?
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Chiara Bertin: The amount of influences that can affect an artist’s work is unmeasurable.
But there is a unique, peculiar person coming to my mind, most vividly of all artists. When I was about 6 years old, my grandfather, an artist from Venice, showed me the way into art. I had no formal art training, but his visceral work communicated to me with urgency his own experience of life and philosophy: he lived in poverty, through the war, and painted all his life. He was not at all aware of contemporary art and without any influence he got into Found and Recycled art; we use to go through the city of Milan together and look in the streets for materials we could reuse.
The most important thing he taught me is actually very simple: Art is a language; if you can't communicate anything more than technical ability, then your work is irrelevant.

Pier Paolo Pasolini is one of the many influences whose art/philosophy has lit a fire under me. His ability to simultaneously embrace conflicting philosophies changed my perspective on life, aesthetics and art.
Among the others: Samuel Beckett and the Theater of the Absurd, Maya Deren and her cinematography, the video artist Shirin Neshat, the artist and pioneer in collage Hannah Höch, the French writer Simone de Beauvoir, the poet Anne Sexton, the performance artist Laurie Anderson…
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L.A.: How do you come up with ideas for your works?
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Chiara Bertin: Exploring human communication and the relation / contrast between nature and technology inspires me constantly.
The external forces around me, the people I meet everyday, the way we “re - represent” our selves through the new media. I question our perception of “reality” and our current human condition, with topics like “self-image”, “the spaces we inhabit (or not)” and “aesthetic (over-sexualized) consumerism”. I mix references from pop-culture with autobiographical material in order to explore alternative definitions of beauty, bodies and habits.
Mostly my art work focuses on Transmedia culture.
I am investigating how content and visual language can flow from one medium to another, and also how new media can emerge.
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"I don't wanna stay"Buy it

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"Little Bunny!"Buy it

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L.A.: Have you always moved in the same direction stylistically or have you noticed substantial variations over the years?
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Chiara Bertin: I have never moved in the same direction from the beginning of my artistic path. Art for me is embracing never-ending experimentation.
For ten years I painted and made collages with my grandfather, constantly learning from his non formal techniques. Ten years later I wanted to experiment more in different directions. I started drawing, writing, and making art ­books. When the computer became an accessible tool I started introducing digital techniques into my work, starting with video and than digital drawing.
Nowadays I recycle my own materials. When an art­ piece is finished and shown, I use the material again for another work. “Recycle art in the process, again and again.”
In this way I give the material a second life, a third life… and so on.
Completing a project inspires me to do another.
Art is a loop: you can always go back and touch up a drawing.
You can always add elements to an installation.
Art is never done, and it can always be redefined.
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"Mr Belluca" Buy it

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L.A.: Can you take one of your works from those presents at LoosenArt Gallery and express a personal comment about meanings or concepts?
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Chiara Bertin: Have you ever felt as you didn’t recognize yourself in the mirror?
Is it possible to recognize the self in a ‘mediated world’?
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“Little Bunny, little Bunny, where have you been?” it’s the title of a series of digital illustrations mixed with hand drawing.
“Little Bunny, little Bunny, where have you been?” is part of “Click.”, a Graphic Novel I created in 2014 inspired by the documentary 'Il corpo delle donne' by Lorella Zanardo.
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'Click.' explores the way women’s bodies are used by the media.
The ideal image of beauty is more brutal than ever. Women’s bodies are still used to sell everything, and are often dismembered into parts: breasts, legs, lips. The woman’s body morphs into the product.
Ideas and images imposed by the press and commerce have become a reference and standard for a lot of people to measure their “beauty” and “success”.
I want to raise questions in a way which is not necessarily just aesthetical. Something with sense, not necessarily activistic, but something that touches people and make them think or react. 
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L.A.: Hopes and projects for the future?
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Chiara Bertin: I will keep on making art in parallel with my job as a Graphic Designer.
Creating keeps me centered as a human being.
Art for me is a lifelong process, it is necessary to me as a tool of investigation and observation.
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"Infinite Chances of Escaping" Buy it

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BUY IT NOW View Chiara Bertin on Gallery
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Chiara Bertin http://chiarabertin.com

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