- Contemporary Visual Art for Human Rights -

A Surreal Vision Exhibition

Posted on June 02 2017

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From the 1st to the 30th of June, the space Millepiani in Rome hosts a collective art show in which a group of photo/graphic works are alternatively exhibited within its rooms.
The artworks created by the group of artists revolve around the main theme suggested by the title of the exhibit: the investigation of the reality, manipulated up to a superior and paradoxical “other” dimension. The premises of a discourse of this kind must be sought in the lesson taught by the artistic avant-gardes – Surrealism in primis, but also Magic Realism of the first decades of the XX century; however, even if originated by these historical basis, the creative outcomes reach a more conscious and independent contemporary (both thematic and technical).

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In an almost concise, but not obvious, manner, the words within the title – “surreal” and “vision” –trace a path throughout the exhibition: in fact, despite their being different (still similar), they reinforce each other, contextualising artworks that, in the end, are almost hallucinating and disturbing. When the image is approached from a closer point of view, the impression is that there is something “different”, unusual in it; then the public startle and, just a moment later, everything appear in a clearer way.

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Pictoria Newhouse Collective "La Era Plasteozoica (The Plasteozoic era)" │ Buy it

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Peter Ydeen "Vogue Couture - Paris, Pennsylvania" │ Buy it

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Places multiplied and mirrored, silent and desolated, unidentified since shown by details, or isolated scenarios à la Hopper are just a few of the selected sites crowding the gallery. Their identity here is so tenuous and their un-recognisability so lingering that, in the end, they are transformed in paradoxical and post-modern “non-places”: they are unique, yet all the same, they are crowded, yet unpopulated.
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And this is exactly the place where men live: dystopian scenes of nowadays, where they exist in marginalised conditions, as clearly stated by their presence/absence within the artworks. There their bodies are aseptically shredded – without violence though –, transformed into fantastic beings, thanks to mirrors or graphic design, and obscured by everyday life objects (unequivocally a hommage to Magritte). Their faces are rarely glimpsed and when they finally are, our attention is anyway directed towards other focuses.
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In the end this is a powerful message, that derives its strong expressivity also from the various chromatic palettes used: whether the artists chose vigorous colour contrasts, underlining the paradox between natural and artificial, or the black and white, maybe more realistic, surely more alienating.

 

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Tamira Boogaard "Mound of the Hill" │ Buy it

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Lynette Miller "Quantum Fluctuation" │ Buy it

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Christoph Hofbauer "Memorable Phenomena #2" │ Buy it

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Samye Asher "Synapses" │ Buy it

 

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Lenka Rayn H "Rayn On Sunday #9" │ Buy it

Nhawfal Juma'at "Subject Documenta: Land" │ Buy it

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Anna Alpatieva "Blue River" │ Buy it
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Sena Cakiroglu "Lost in Death Valley" │ Buy it
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Kathleen Rogers "Becoming Holograms" │ Buy it

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