LoosenArt Mag / Gallery

Home: A Place About Us

Posted on October 05 2020

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Author S Colombo
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Home │ 7th August - 16th September 2020
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One has never experienced his/her house so much as this year. In 2020, during the pandemic lockdown, we have learnt to be acquainted with, to love or even hate our domestic spaces. We felt safe in that cocoon, we let those walls protect us, but also isolate us from the rest world. The expression “feeling at home” refers to a concept that goes way beyond the physical area where our routine takes place. It deals with ourselves and with our relationship with a site that doesn’t need to be the town we were born or the house where we grew up. That domestic feeling can show up at any time and in any place - indoors as well as outdoors, on the street or in the attic, sometimes even nowhere.

As the artist Ugo La Pietra affirmed, “to reside means feeling ourselves at home in any place”: that implies that we need to take our surroundings back until we reach a conscious level of confidence. Confidence that, in its turn, hides lights and shadows, positive and negative sides.
All this, and much more, is stated by the artists exhibiting at “Home”, a group show arranged by Loosenart at Spazio Millepiani (Rome) and open to the public from 7 August to 16 September 2020. Since their look lingers on multiple subjects in constant change, the resulting pictures are at times introspective, at times projected towards the society. If those walls could talk, they would surely tell stories of real life, as well as of journeys and shifts. The houses and, more generally, the buildings portrayed in these shots whisper anecdotes about migration, relocation and absence. In their abandonment, they become the reflection of their present beings.
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Anthony Licata, Pillow Talking, 2020  Buy it
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Anthony Licata, Hung Dream, 2020  Buy it
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A house can be conceived as a gift or, on the contrary, as a privation. With a documentary angle, these pictures reveal a strong, social and common interest in other’s people life, and especially in those struggling and living in temporary shelters, built with discarded objects found on the street and once belonged to who knows who - who knows when. The artists here show as to inform, but also as to highlight, admonish and recall what ‘real-life’ can be.
Though in very different ways, some artists approached the exhibition’s theme in a personal and intimate manner. Some affirm that home is the reflection of one’s past, where yesterday and today overlap becoming a continuum. So the settings brought into focus are scenes crowded by familiar faces and rooms full of memories. A quick turn into the past, when we were kids, in order to suddenly find ourselves adults again. It’s our ego projecting itself multiple times and forging our complex identity.

Isolation and loneliness, described in a pictorial way - like Caravaggio’s paintings, where light and dark meets - are the nuances illustrated by a group of other artists. Here home is the space in which we move, a room where we feel dazed and estranged, but it can also be something abstract, such a peculiar kind of feeling. And it is exactly that comfort raised by the places we hang out at, that sense of belonging that welcomes us home. We would like to feel at home every day of our life - but no one can tell if we will ever feel it.
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Aleksander Tatarenko, Marina Spivak's Room, 2010  Buy it
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Maria Baiba, Journey, 2019  Buy it
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Anastasiya Novikova, Girl on the Red Bedspread, 2019  Buy it
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Lara Wilde, Oil, 2018  Buy it
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Francis Malapris, The Inside Person #45, 2018
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Laura Migliorino, Downstairs, 2018
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Weronika Teresa Klisiewicz, Bramble, New Jersey, 2020  Buy it
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Laura Migliorino, Iva Dzaja
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Maria Baiba, Adam Leitzel
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