- Contemporary Visual Art for Human Rights -

LoosenArt Advices. Hang your pictures

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Purchasing an art print is the best way to give an original touch to your rooms, halls etc., prints and photographs are elements of strong visual impact which substantially contribute to the creation of an atmosphere.

In this tutorial we will show you some specific rules that will allow you to create the atmosphere you are looking for to make your rooms original and unique and we'll give you some advice on the choice and right placement of your prints with the right sensibility.
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1. Placement and aesthetic composition
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Prints and photographs play an important role in the creation of an aesthetic composition which includes accessories and architectural elements belonging or inserted in a given context.

It 's important to creat a dialogo between all these items and place them bearing in mind the big picture: styles, colors, sizes and materials of the different elements must bind to each other in a natural way.
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2. Styles, color and the viewer's gaze.
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Each object within an environment constitutes a point to which attention is drawn to the viewer's gazes, a focal point. In the arrangement of the prints, the goal is to create a dialoge maintaining a balance between the various elements, not to create a sense of visual clutter. A particularly important principle in rooms inspired byminimal style.
Colors and styles of the print are two important aspects to create a good balance of the composition, they must be combined with naturalness with the elements that characterize the environment in which the prints are inserted.
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Larger objects capture the viewer's gaze more easily, constitute the strongest focal points and all others should be designed to rotate around them. In general, it would be better to avoid both the excess and the defect of visual stimuli, identifying for each environment the right measure.
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3. Placement on the walls.
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Each print should be positioned so as to be always visible by the observer. In general, the rule is to arrange the prints at 5/8 of the wall height, an example, for a wall of 3 meters, the center of the print should be at 1.85 meters. Certainly we must also consider the size of the room, of the picture, and of the subjects, style and colors, from which will depend the distance the observer will be. An example, large squares with few details (generally the landscapes prints), and dark tones are to be kept up, since they should be admired through a view that embraces them in their entirety.
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Instead, smaller pictures, rich in details and light colors should be kept down in order to be better observed.
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If you want to create a group of images to hang within a wall or a portion of it you have to keep in mind a few rules in order to avoid creating a clutter effect.
If we have a large print or one of a strong impact you must grant the right visibility by placing it on a large surface (also a whole wall), or by leaving an empty space around it to ensure that the observer's attention is directed to it.


A row of prints must be aligned in order to give a pleasing visual sensation. It's possible to align the various elements on their lower side, on their highest one or on their midline. A very elegant effect is when the prints are also aligned to another element presented in the room, such as the top of a door jamb. It's important, however, that if the larger prints are of different sizes will be positioned at the two ends of the row, and that the distance between the various elements will result uniform. Similarly, these rules can also be applied to the vertical placement.

A pictures block must respect a certain geometric balance: the outer edges must be aligned on the perimeter of a square or the one of a rectangle enclosing the composition, the distance between the pictures should be uniform and should maintain a chromatic concordance and a general style. With different size prints, we must place the largest in the center and then fit the little ones on the ends of the figure.
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In case of narrow walls on the other hand, for example like those of an entrance, between two windows or near a door, you can use vertical pictures that fill in the space, while maintaining a geometric balance with the surrounding space.
 
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4. Last practical advice
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- It's to be avoided the juxtaposition of paintings and photographs or other digital printing.
- Lighting should be from above and not from the side, in the latter case, the printing is more subject to reflections.
- In the case of portraits and of people's pictures, the faces' subjects of the different prints must point towards each other to create a
geometric composure between the different lines of sight.
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