- Contemporary Visual Art for Human Rights -

A Surreal Vision - The Exhibition

Posted on June 02 2017

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From the 1st to the 30th of June, the space Millepiani in Rome hosts a collective art show in which a group of photo/graphic works are alternatively exhibited within its rooms.
The artworks created by the group of artists revolve around the main theme suggested by the title of the exhibit: the investigation of the reality, manipulated up to a superior and paradoxical “other” dimension. The premises of a discourse of this kind must be sought in the lesson taught by the artistic avant-gardes – Surrealism in primis, but also Magic Realism of the first decades of the XX century; however, even if originated by these historical basis, the creative outcomes reach a more conscious and independent contemporary (both thematic and technical).

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In an almost concise, but not obvious, manner, the words within the title – “surreal” and “vision” –trace a path throughout the exhibition: in fact, despite their being different (still similar), they reinforce each other, contextualising artworks that, in the end, are almost hallucinating and disturbing. When the image is approached from a closer point of view, the impression is that there is something “different”, unusual in it; then the public startle and, just a moment later, everything appear in a clearer way.

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Pictoria Newhouse Collective "La Era Plasteozoica (The Plasteozoic era)" │ Buy it

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Peter Ydeen "Vogue Couture - Paris, Pennsylvania" │ Buy it

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Places multiplied and mirrored, silent and desolated, unidentified since shown by details, or isolated scenarios à la Hopper are just a few of the selected sites crowding the gallery. Their identity here is so tenuous and their un-recognisability so lingering that, in the end, they are transformed in paradoxical and post-modern “non-places”: they are unique, yet all the same, they are crowded, yet unpopulated.
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And this is exactly the place where men live: dystopian scenes of nowadays, where they exist in marginalised conditions, as clearly stated by their presence/absence within the artworks. There their bodies are aseptically shredded – without violence though –, transformed into fantastic beings, thanks to mirrors or graphic design, and obscured by everyday life objects (unequivocally a hommage to Magritte). Their faces are rarely glimpsed and when they finally are, our attention is anyway directed towards other focuses.
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In the end this is a powerful message, that derives its strong expressivity also from the various chromatic palettes used: whether the artists chose vigorous colour contrasts, underlining the paradox between natural and artificial, or the black and white, maybe more realistic, surely more alienating.

 

Tamira Boogaard "Mound of the Hill" │ Buy it

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Lynette Miller "Quantum Fluctuation" │ Buy it

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Christoph Hofbauer "Memorable Phenomena #2" │ Buy it

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Samye Asher "Synapses" │ Buy it

 

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Lenka Rayn H "Rayn On Sunday #9" │ Buy it

Nhawfal Juma'at "Subject Documenta: Land" │ Buy it

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Anna Alpatieva "Blue River" │ Buy it
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Sena Cakiroglu "Lost in Death Valley" │ Buy it
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Kathleen Rogers "Becoming Holograms" │ Buy it

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